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Third branchial cyst

Third branchial cleft cyst is a rare congenital disease of the neck. It presents as a painless mass that develops rapidly in the neck following an infection. This is the first case report of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by a third branchial cleft cyst Third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are rare entities that represent abnormal persistence of the branchial apparatus. On CT examination, these cysts appear as homogeneous low-attenuation masses with well-circumscribed margins; on MR imaging, they demonstrate variable signal intensity on T1-weighted images and are hyperintense relative to muscle on T2-weighted images

SUMMARY: Third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are rare entities that represent abnormal persistence of the branchial apparatus. On CT examination, these cysts appear as homogeneous low-attenuation masses with well-circumscribed margins; on MR imaging, they demonstrate variable signal intensity on T1-weighted images and are hyperintense relative to muscle on T2-weighted images Noncommunicating third branchial cyst Mohammed H. Al-Akeely, MBBS, CABS, Youssuf A. Al-Suhaibani, CABS, SBS, Kamran Khalid, FRCSI, FRCSEd. hird branchial cyst is a rare condition that arises from the embryonic remnants of the third branchial cleft. The cyst may be discovere Left posterior triangle cystic mass lesion; impressive of an infected third branchial cleft cyst (BCC) rather than a unilocular lymphangioma with bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. References Joshi MJ, Provenzano MJ, Smith RJ et-al The authors describe a 44-year-old woman in whom an infected third branchial cleft cyst was initially misdiagnosed as an abscess and drained surgically. Repeat surgery was necessary when the patient's symptoms recurred several weeks later A 2nd branchial cleft cyst is situated in the posterior submandibular space between the submandibular gland and SCM muscle. 1st branchial cleft cysts are found in the region of the parotid gland. 3rd branchial cleft cysts are found in the posterior cervical space, as shown here

Third branchial cleft cyst as a cause of hoarseness: a

The rare third branchial cleft cyst - PubMe

Third branchial cleft cysts: Most third branchial cleft cysts occur on the left side of the neck close to the thyroid gland (a butterfly-shaped gland on the front of the throat) and within the muscle attached to the collarbone. This type is less common than the first and second type. Fourth branchial cleft cysts: Fourth branchial cleft cysts are rare branchial cleft cyst, third branchial cleft cyst, Mycobacterium Branchial cleft anomalies result from developmental changes of the branchial apparatus. 1 Third branchial cleft anomalies are rare entities, with a prevalence of 2% to 8%. 2 The most common presentation is a left-sided recurrent neck abscess or suppurative thyroiditis These cysts generally appear after age 10. This is the most common type of branchial cleft abnormality. Third branchial cleft sinuses. These are near the thyroid gland in the front part of the..

Lateral cervical cysts, sinuses, and fistulas have been described as anomalies of the normal development of the branchial apparatus. Third branchial apparatus anomalies are rare and constitute less than 1% of all such cases. Three cases of third branchial cleft cysts and sinus tracts are presented Branchial cleft cysts are congenital anomalies arising from the first through fourth pharyngeal clefts. The most common type of branchial cleft cyst arises from the second cleft, with anomalies derived from the first, third, and fourth clefts being rarer. As this is a congenital anomaly, it is prese Branchial cleft cysts may arise from remnants of the first, second or third branchial arches; these are categorized in Table 1. Most branchial cleft cysts are of second branchial arch origin and are commonly found in the anterior triangle of the neck anterior to the upper third of the sternocleidomastoid muscle at the mandibular angle 9) Cysts can be anywhere in the neck down to the mediastinum, however, in most cases, they are located adjacent to the thyroid gland. The proximity of the third and fourth branchial arches makes distinguishing third from fourth branchial cleft abnormalities radiologically difficult. For an accurate diagnosis, the relationship of the sinus tract to the superior laryngeal nerve must be determined surgically

Etiology: remnant of embryonal branchial arch incompletely obliterated, courses from hypopharynx to supraclavicular region in upper posterior cervical space Imaging: look in posterior triangle, mandibular angle, mediastinum Clinical: 2% of branchial cleft cysts, presents with thymic cyst Cases of Third Branchial Cleft Cyst This is the first description of successful surgical excision of a parapharyngeal (retrostyloid compartment) cyst remnant of the third branchial arch. Introduction An extremely rare parapharyngeal-retrostyloid compartment presentation of a deep upper neck abscess, proved on surgery to originate from an infected branchial cyst is presented. Case. Third branchial cleft cysts are estimated to represent 2-8% of all branchial cleft anomalies. When present, the external skin opening is seen over the middle to lower third of the anterior SCM. The third branchial cleft sinus course is as follows: from the skin opening described above, the tract courses deep to platysma and course posterior to the internal carotid artery

A branchial cyst commonly presents as a solitary, painless mass in the neck of a child or a young adult. A history of intermittent swelling and tenderness of the lesion during upper respiratory.. Huang RY et al: Third branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a retropharyngeal abscess. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 54 (2-3):167-72, 2000. Mandell DL: Head and neck anomalies related to the branchial apparatus. Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 33 (6):1309-32, 2000 A branchial cleft cyst is a cyst as a swelling in the lateral part of the neck near the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Sometimes, the branchial cleft cyst can occur with an opening known as the fistula. The cause is usually due to a birth defect arising from the failure of fusion of the second and third branchial arches Branchial cleft cysts result from failure of normal degradation of the branchial apparatus. The branchial apparatus is found in the developing embryo, and with development yields the structures of the head, face, and neck. These brachial or pharyngeal arches develop from the 3rd to 8th week of gestation

The primitive thymus and inferior parathyroid derive from the third branchial cleft. During embryonic development, these structures descend, reaching their final localisation. Third branchial cleft anomalies present usually as a fistula, abscess or cyst.. Left posterior triangle cystic mass lesion; impressive of an infected third branchial cleft cyst (BCC) rather than a unilocular lymphangioma with bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy

The Rare Third Branchial Cleft Cyst American Journal of

Third branchial cleft cyst. A congenital epithelial cyst that develops due to failure of obliteration of the second branchial cleft during embryonic development. It appears as a lump on the side of the neck. Disease Alternative Name. branchial cleft cyst. branchioma. cyst of branchial cleft Third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are rare entities that represent abnormal persistence of the branchial apparatus. Most cases of third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are diagnosed in childhood and show a marked preference for the left side. However, here we present this rare anomaly in a 40 year old female which presented as a fast growing swelling in adulthood

Third branchial apparatus anomalies are rare and constitute less than 1% of all such cases. Three cases of third branchial cleft cysts and sinus tracts are presented. Two patients had previously. The presentation of an infected branchial cleft cyst extending into the retropharyngeal space is extremely rare. However, differentiation of this lesion from a simple retropharyngeal abscess is important for surgical planning. The authors describe a 44-year-old woman in whom an infected third branchial cleft cyst was initially misdiagnosed as an abscess and drained surgically 3rd/4th Arch Branchial Cleft Cyst (Fistula) return to: Brachial Arch Anatomy and Embryology see also: 3rd 4th Branchial Cleft Cyst Fistula Case 2 under constructio Third branchial cleft sinuses, which develop close to the thyroid gland in the front part of the muscle which attaches to the collarbone; Fourth branchial cleft sinuses, which affect the area below the neck. The most common type of Branchial cleft abnormality is 'Second branchial cleft sinuses,' or the failure of fusion of the second and.

branchial cleft cyst parotid - Google Search | Clefts

A branchial cyst is a cavity that is a congenital remnant from embryologic development. A branchial cyst is also called branchial cleft cyst.; It is present at birth on one side of the neck and is located just in front of the large angulated muscle on either side of the neck running from just behind the ear down to the clavicle (collarbone). This muscle is called the sternocleidomastoid muscle Figure 7: 3rd Branchial cleft cyst presen-ting as a deep neck abscess Figure 8: Infected 2nd branchial cleft cyst Cutaneous sinuses and fistulae present -cleidomastoid muscle. 1st Branchial cleft cysts/sinuses/fistulae 1st branchial cleft anomalies are uncom-mon and result from incomplete closure of the ventral part of the 1st branchial clef The branchial cleft cyst also known as lateral cervical cyst is usually present in the lateral part of neck deep to sternocleidomastoid muscle at the junction of its upper third and lower two thirds Keywords branchial cleft cyst, third branchial cleft cyst, Mycobacterium Branchial cleft anomalies result from developmental changes of the branchial apparatus. 1 Third branchial cleft anomalies are rare entities, with a prevalence of 2% to 8%. 2 The most common presentation is a left-sided recurrent neck abscess or suppurative thyroiditis Branchial cysts are smooth, non-tender, fluctuant, translucent masses, which occur along the lower one third of the antero-medial border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle between the muscle and the overlying skin. Secondary branchial cleft cyst lesion: The lesion may be tender if secondarily inflamed or infected

Third and fourth branchial pouch cyst infections are an uncommon cause of anterior neck abscesses often confused with other entities, such as thyroglossal duct cysts and thyroid abscesses leading to misdiagnosis, recurrence, and increased morbidity related to a delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment Branchial pouch cysts clinically mimic deep neck space infection and misdiagnosis leads to surgical drainage which can complicate into a persistently draining sinus or fistula. We present a unique case of infected third branchial pouch cyst in an infant who presented with acute stridor and our experience in its management

Third branchial cleft cyst Radiology Case Radiopaedia

  1. 3rd Branchial cleft cyst. 3rd branchial cleft cysts are estimated to represent 2-8% of all branchial cleft anomalies. When present, the external skin opening is seen over the middle to lower third of the anterior SCM. The course of the 3rd branchial cleft sinus is as follows
  2. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): Third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are rare entities that represent abnormal persistence of the branchial apparatus. Most cases of third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are diagnosed in childhood and show a marked preference for the left side. However, here we present this rare anomaly in a 40 year old female which.
  3. —A third branchial cleft cyst most commonly appears as a unilocular cystic mass centered in the posterior cervical space on CT and MR images. As with other branchial cleft cysts, the cyst fluid may vary in signal intensity on T1-weighted images depending on the protein concentration and is typically hyperintense relative to muscle on T2.
  4. Parapharyngeal (retrostyloid)—third branchial cleft cyst - Volume 105 Issue
  5. 3 rd & 4 th Branchial cysts/sinuses/fistulae. Figure 27: External opening of 3 rd branchial fistula that presented with recurrent neck abscesses. Third and 4 th branchial cleft cysts are rare. Because of their common origin from the Sinus of His, 3 rd and 4 th branchial cleft cysts share certain features

Surgical excision is definitive treatment for branchial cleft cysts. [ 14] A series of horizontal incisions, known as a stairstep or stepladder incision, is made to fully dissect out the occasionally tortuous path of the branchial cleft cysts. Branchial cleft cyst surgery is best delayed until the patient is at least age 3 months BRANCHIAL CLEFT CYSTS are congenital cysts, that arise in the lateral aspect of the neck when the second branchial cleft fails to close during embryonic development. At about the fourth week of embryonic life, 4 branchial (or pharyngeal) clefts develop between 5 ridges known as the branchial (or pharyngeal) arches A branchial cyst is a congenital abnormality arising when the second branchial cleft fails to properly form during fetal development.This leaves a space surrounded by epithelial tissue in the lateral aspect of the neck.This space can fill with fluid. This fluid filled lump is called a branchial cyst. Branchial cysts arising from the first, third and fourth branchial clefts are possible.

Cysts in the Posterior Triangle of the Neck in Adults

Infected third branchial cleft cyst: retropharyngeal

Third branchial cleft cyst is a rare congenital disease of the neck. It presents as a painless mass that develops rapidly in the neck following an infection. This is the first case report of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by a third branchial cleft cyst. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of hoarseness as her only symptom; she had no pain, fever, dysphagia, dyspnoea. Developed by renowned radiologists in each specialty, STATdx provides comprehensive decision support you can rely on - 3rd Branchial Cleft Cyst. link. Bookmarks (0) Pediatrics. Diagnosis. Head and Neck. Multiple Regions, Head and Neck. 3rd Branchial Cleft Cyst. Branchial anomalies (BAs) are a consequence of abnormal development of the branchial apparatus during embryogenesis. The branchial apparatus that begins to form in the second week of fetal life and is completed by the sixth or seventh week is probably the structure most widely believed to be the source of branchial cleft cysts [].Persistence of branchial apparatus remnants will result in. A solitary third or fourth branchial cyst may be contained completely within the thyroid gland and may present as a cold nodule. Such a cyst might be completely intrathyroidal and may be confused with a thyroglossal duct cyst. (7) The signs and symptoms of such a cyst are broad and similar to those of more common disease entities.. Branchial cleft cysts are congenital anomalies which develop in utero, most commonly arising from the second branchial cleft. They are often asymptomatic lateral neck masses but can enlarge and become symptomatic in the setting of infection. The cystic cavity can form a potential space which can harbor infection and, in rare cases, malignant spread of primary tumors

3rd Branchial Cleft Cyst - Neuroradiology Teaching File

Video: Branchial Cleft Cysts and Sinus Tracts Symptoms & Causes

Branchial cleft cyst - Wikipedi

Branchial Cleft Cysts: Causes and Symptom

Third Branchial Cleft Cyst with Mycobacterium Infection

Third branchial cleft cyst Third branchial arch 2%—rare Deep inside the sternocleidomastoid, may be with fistulous tract into larynx Fourth branchial cleft cyst Fourth branchial arch Very rare Arises from lateral neck and parallels recurrent laryngeal nerve. Various locations (including mediastinum) Branchial cleft cyst: a rare cas Find all the evidence you need on Branchial cleft cyst via the Trip Database. Helping you find trustworthy answers on Branchial cleft cyst | Latest evidence made eas Info about third branchial fistula and cyst Branchial cleft cyst manifesting as hypoglossal nerve pal...the first and third branchial cleft cysts or sinuses may have openings just below the jaw a... Infection is the main indication for removal. A branchial cleft. Abstract. SUMMARY: Third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are rare entities that represent abnormal persistence of the branchial apparatus. On CT examination, these cysts appear as homogeneous low-attenuation masses with well-circumscribed margins; on MR imaging, they demonstrate variable signal intensity on T1-weighted images and are hyperintense relative to muscle on T2-weighted images A branchial cleft cyst may form from fluid drained from a sinus. The cyst or sinus can become infected. Symptoms. Symptoms include: Small pits, lumps or skin tags at either side of the neck or just below the collarbone . Fluid drainage from a pit on the neck . Diagnosis. Branchial cleft cysts can usually be diagnosed with a physical examination

muscle. First branchial cysts are relatively rare, and are usually located in the parotid region (Arnot Type I) or high in the anterior triangle extending to the external auditory canal (Arnot Type II). 17,18 Third and fourth branchial cysts are quite rare and are studied as case reports in the literature.1 Second branchial arch anomalies were seen in 17 cases (50%). Of these, branchial cyst constituted eight (26.53%) cases while branchial fistula constituted nine (26.47%) cases. Third branchial arch anomaly was seen in two (5.88%) patients. Fourth branchial arch anomaly was seen in two (5.88%) patients (Figure 5) Sagittal view of head and neck in a patient with a branchial cyst Branchial cyst Sternocleidomastoid muscle (Lower two thirds only in this plane) Title: Branchial cyst Created Date The most common congenital neck masses are branchial cleft anomalies, thyroglossal duct cysts, lymphangiomas, hemangiomas and dermoid cysts. In this section, we will discuss the branchial cleft cyst. How does a branchial cleft anomaly present? Most branchial cleft sinuses/tracts/fistulae are asymptomatic, but they may become infected and drain

18 The cysts arise from the third and fourth branchial clefts,and, therefore, thymic cysts may have a similar appearance to third and fourth branchial cleft cysts, being differentiated only by the presence of thymic tissue within thymic cysts. The cysts usually present as a unilocular cystic mass extending inferiorly within the neck. Branchial cysts appear most often as unilateral neck masses and account for 25% of head and neck congenital swellings, of which 95% arise from the second branchial cleft. Here, the authors report a rare case of branchial cleft cyst in a 16-year-old girl, which is often misdiagnosed and treated improperly. Receive our free quarterly newsletters. Third branchial cyst in the left pyriform sinus (Bailey's type IV) is an unusual cause of dysphonia in pediatric. Our present case report is the first brachial cyst to be reported in the pyriform fossa and the second branchial anomalies to be excised transorally with CO 2 laser In humans, dogs, and cats, there are rare reports of third and fourth branchial arch anomalies extending into the mediastinum, but a similar occurrence has yet to be reported in birds. 21-23 The location of the cyst made diagnosis challenging because it was not apparent on physical exam and required imaging techniques to discover and localize.

Branchial Cleft Cyst: Causes, Types, and Symptom

Third branchial anomalies

The third branchial cleft cyst is found on the chest wall just below the collar bone. The tract of the third branchial cleft cyst is usually only a few millimeters deep. Symptoms: Branchial cleft cyst appears as small pits, skin tags, or lumps which are present on either side of the neck or right under the collarbone Primary branchial cleft cyst lesion: Branchial cysts are smooth, nontender, fluctuant masses, which occur along the lower one third of the anteromedial border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Third branchial apparatus anomalies are rare and constitute less than 1% of all such cases. Three cases of third branchial cleft cysts and sinus tracts are presented. Two patients had previously undergone multiple attempts at extirpation. Complete removal of recurrent branchial anomalies is difficult because of scarring and fascial plane. It has been noted that these third branchial cleft cysts, when diagnosed in children, are found to be more commonly situated on the left side [4]. Anatomically, the third and fourth arch sinuses lie in close proximity to each other, and it therefore becomes a tedious task to distinguish between the two types simply by imaging modalities Noninfected third branchial cleft cyst on the right side of the neck following the course of the embryonal thymopharyngeal duct (arrows). A, Coronal T2 fat-saturated image. B, Schematic representation of the course of the thymopharyngeal duct. however, this is seen in only a very few cases

Branchial Cleft Cyst - PubMe

branchial cleft cyst: a cervical cyst arising from developmental persistence of an ectodermal pharyngeal groove, usually the second. It is frequently located anterior to the inferior third of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Synonym(s): branchial cleft cyst Thyroglossal Duct Cysts and Branchial Cleft Cysts Jessica L. Buicko Adam Michael Kravietz Head and neck masses are common in children. Location of the mass is key to diagnosis. Also it is important to determine if the lesion is solid or cystic. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF HEAD AND NECK MASSES IN CHILDREN (FIGURE 38.1) Thyroglossal duc epidermoid cysts), and Type II lesions showing ectoderm with skin appendages and some-times cartilage representing mesoderm. A cyst from the first branchial cleft may also be present within the parotid gland. Rarely, the third branchial cleft persists in which case a cyst or sinus tract is associ-ated with the pyriform recess in the hypopharynx

Branchial cleft cyst causes, types, signs, symptoms

Twenty-one patients had a branchial cleft cyst, and 29 patients showed malignant cystic adenopathy confirmed by pathology . Figures 2 and 3 show examples of findings seen in the two populations. The branchial cleft cyst population had 11 men and 10 women as compared with the 15 men and 14 women in the malignant population (p = 0.96) Third Branchial Cleft Anomalies . Third BCAs are rare but can have many similarities with second arch anomalies. Cysts again present with a mass deep to the SCM, as with second arch anomalies. The skin opening again is low in the lateral neck anterior to the SCM. These tend to occur on the left side of the neck The four types of branchial cleft cysts are named after the branchial arches that they arise from — first, second, third, and fourth. The first branchial cleft cyst has two types: type I and type II. Type I first branchial cleft cysts are rare, and represent a duplication of the external ear canal. These can be near the facial nerve, which is.

Fourth branchial cleft cyst Radiology Reference Article

  1. Third and fourth branchial pouch anomalies are rare and usually present as lateral neck masses, abscesses or with acute suppurative thyroiditis. An opening in the piriform sinus can be identified in most cases. We present four cases of fourth branchial pouch sinuses, one of a third branchial cyst and discuss our management
  2. Third and Fourth Branchial Anomalies 1923 instances, wide-field extirpation of the cyst, sinus tract, 3. Lin J-N, Wang K-L. Persistent third branchial apparatus. and surrounding scar tissue may be necessary to prevent J Pediatr Surg 1991;26:663- 665
  3. Branchial cleft cysts are further subdivided based on the developmental origin First branchial cleft cysts account for less than 1 percent of branchial cleft Skin nodules in newborns and infants of the lesion and thyroid function are not problems, they can be followed clinically
  4. branchial: [ brang´ke-al ] pertaining to, or resembling, gills of a fish or derivatives of homologous parts in higher animals. branchial cyst a cyst formed deep within the neck from an incompletely closed pharyngeal groove ( branchial cleft ), usually between the second and third pharyngeal arches ( branchial arches ). These two arches grow.
  5. A branchial cyst is a self-contained structure without an internal or external opening. A branchial sinus is a blind-ending tract that connects with either the skin or the pharynx. Those that communicate with the skin are called branchial cyst sinuses, and those that connect to the viscera are called branchial pouch sinuses

Third Branchial Cleft Cyst Pediatric Radiology Reference

  1. Cysts arising from the lateral neck commonly represent benign lesions such as branchial cysts and lymphangiomas. Occasionally a cyst of the lateral cervical region is a malignant lesion metastatic from a papillary thyroid carcinoma
  2. First branchial cleft types and pathways type II. More Common. Ectoderm and Mesoderm elements. Duplicated membranous EAC and pinna. Presents near angle of mandible --> passes lateral or medial to CN VII --> ends near or in the EAC. 2nd branchial cleft cyst location. cyst along the border of SCM. Second branchial cleft fistula pathway
  3. The cyst reviewed here were also almost equally distributed between left and right sides of neck (p>0.05). Bilateral cysts were seen only in few cases. The frequency of cyst derived third branchial cleft was very rare in male but in female cases the rare cyst was derived from the fourth cleft
  4. The third branchial cleft fistula is a rare type of branchial cleft anomaly that only accounts for 2-8 % of all the anomalies [3, 4], with approximately 94 % of these anomalies found on the left side . Anatomical findings show that the third branchial cleft fistula passes along the carotid sheath and then travels between the glossopharyngeal.

Branchiogenic Cyst - an overview ScienceDirect Topic

  1. Branchial cysts can occur within the lymph nodes in the parotid gland and on the surface of the gland [ 10 ]. The cysts appear to be painless, slow-growing, firm, elastic and fluctuant masses and may vary in size from 0.5 cm to 5 cm in diameter [ 18 ]. In most of the cases the superficial lobe of the parotid gland is involved [ 19 ]
  2. Third branchial cleft cysts present anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle and lower in the neck than either first or second branchial cleft anomalies. Third branchial cleft cysts are deep to the third arch derivatives (eg, the glossopharyngeal nerve and the internal carotid artery) and superficial to fourth arch derivatives (eg, the vagus
  3. Primary branchial cleft cyst lesion: Branchial cysts are smooth, nontender, fluctuant masses, which occur along the lower one third of the anteromedial border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle between the muscle and the overlying skin. Secondary branchial cleft cyst lesion: The lesion may be tender if secondarily inflamed or infected
  4. During 4th week of embryonic development, five branchial arches grow into distinct parts of head and neck. All consist of arteries, nerves, muscle, skeletal tissue. If arches fail to fuse--> soft tissue anomaly on lateral neck may form, called branchial cleft anomaly. Anomalies include cysts (most common), fistulas, sinus tracts
Branchial anomalies

Second branchial cleft cyst Radiology Reference Article

  1. Definition: A branchial cleft cyst is a congenital epithelial cyst that arises on the lateral part of the neck usually due to failure of obliteration of the second branchial cleft (or failure of fusion of the second and third branchial arches) in embryonic development.Less commonly, the cysts can develop from the first, third, or fourth clefts.
  2. Based on the anatomic location of the mass, clinical presentation, histopathologic characteristics, and CK-positive immunolabeling, the diagnosis was branchial cleft cyst, similar to second branchial cyst type II-III reported in humans
  3. Discussion. Branchial cysts represent swellings of the neck due to a remnant of the branchial cleft. When there is an opening in the skin it is called a branchial cleft sinus. They can arise from.
  4. Introduction. Branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are the most common congenital masses of the lateral neck and are caused by abnormal embryonic development ().Second BCCs are the most common subtype of BCCs and are responsible for ~95% of all cases ().Second BCCs are divided into four types based on Bailey's criterion ().In previous studies, typical imaging observations of BCCs have been described ()
  5. Branchial Cleft Cyst Article - StatPearl
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